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Designing a Vegetable Plot

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Even as a gardener, I find there is something different and special about growing my own vegetables. As much as I marvel at producing beautiful plants for my garden from seed or cuttings and seeing them take their place in the flower bed, there is an added something that really seems to complete this process when you grow vegetables. For me that is picking, cooking and eating the plants I have produced -complete satisfaction. You don’t need a huge piece of land to create a successful vegetable plot and there are many different ways of vegetable gardening. But first there are a few points to consider when designing a plot.

Where to situate your plot

There are a number of important factors to consider when deciding where to grow vegetables. Soil will be the engine in the production of your vegetables so it is essential that you pick the right patch of ground. Measuring the pH of your soil will enable you to determine whether it is alkaline or acid. Vegetables grow best in a soil that is slightly acidic with a pH of 6.5. You can buy a perfectly good testing kit from your local garden centre. If your soil to acid you can add garden lime to reduce the acidity. You will also need to think about drainage. Most vegetables prefer free-draining soil, so if your patch tends to be waterlogged or floods at certain times of the year it won’t be suitable. Soil structure is also important. A clay soil, although rich in nutrients will have poor drainage and is slow to warm up in spring. Sandy soil drains far too easily and therefore won’t hold enough water or nutrients and dries out in summer. Loam lies somewhere in between and contains the best features of both sandy and clay soils. Sadly this ideal is rarely found, but not impossible to create. The answer is to spend plenty of time improving your soil with well-rotted organic matter such as manure or compost.

Another important consideration in where to situate your vegetable plot is the elements. Vegetables need as much sun as possible, so at least half of your site must have full sun all day. Windy conditions will slow down vegetable growth, so if there is no protection from wind you will need to create some by planting a hedge or placing a fence in the right place. Nearby trees will afford some protection from wind but you don’t want them too close so that they cast too much shade. Frosts can also be a problem for vegetable gardening. Low-lying sites will encourage cold air to collect. Also be aware that nearby trees and buildings can also be sources of cold air.

It may seem obvious but pay some attention to water. Vegetables need plenty of it so situating your plot near an outside tap is essential. It is also a good idea to install a water butt to catch rain water. A final consideration is access. If you have designed your plot around a series of beds you will need easy access to each bed for sowing, weeding and harvesting. If you intend to create paths to give you access, make sure they are hard wearing – slabs or even old scaffolding planks are good.

Deciding how to grow vegetables

The points above apply to any vegetable plot whether large or small. If you only have a small plot you may want to consider the best way to grow your vegetables. Where space is limited, raised beds are a good answer. You can even create a raised bed on a patio. Raised beds are essentially wooden containers filled with fertile soil. They are also ideal if you have trouble bending over or are confined to a wheelchair.

Another useful way of growing vegetables is to integrate them among your other garden plants. Legumes such as beans and peas can look stunning growing up a plant support in the middle of a flower bed. Lettuce is great grown at the front of a flower bed where it is easily assessed. The only problem with integration is the amount of vegetables you can grow.

Many vegetables can also be successfully grown in garden planters and even hanging baskets. Vegetables that thrive in pots include beetroot, carrots, radishes, lettuce and spring onions. Another advantage of container vegetable growing is that you can follow the sun around your garden, moving your vegetables around so that they get the maximum amount of sunlight.

Once you have decided where and how to grow vegetables you are then ready to choose what to grow and start growing!



Source by Jo Poultney

How to Grow Vegetables Year Round With Indoor Aquaponics

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By utilizing aquaponics to create your very own indoor garden, you will no longer have to worry about paying that outrageous price for fresh vegetables in the winter. Instead you can grow your vegetables year round right in your basement or spare bedroom. Talk about fresh! And maybe best of all is the fact that you will have first hand knowledge of what you are eating. Hint: it’s all organic.

If you aren’t familiar with aquaponics, let me get you up to speed quickly. Aquaponics is simply an expansion of hydroponics–the art of growing plants without the use of dirt or soil. The plant’s roots sit directly in a container of water. The plant itself is usually in a floating type of bed. With hydroponics you had to add nutrition into the water to feed the plants.

With aquaponics, the plants get their nutrition in a much more natural and organic way. From fish. If you’ve ever kept fish before, you know that they can put out some pretty nasty by-products like ammonia, etc. Well, here’s where we see the great circle of life in action–those nasty by-products are just exactly what plants need to thrive. So the fish emulsion feeds the plants and as the plants take what they need from the water, they filter the water for the fish. All natural and all organic.

If you’re wondering what kinds of plants your can raise with aquaponics–well, basically anything goes. Beginners might want to start with a leafy green veggie like lettuce. It’s generally the easiest to grow. Other plants you can add as you get the hang of it include herbs, watercress, peas, beans, red and green peppers, strawberries, and melons. You can really try just about anything. In fact the true test of whether or not a plant will work for you is just to try it and see.

There is another benefit of aquaponic gardening, too. You also get to eat the fish! If you are looking for a way to become sustainable (or off the grid), this type of garden will not only give you fresh year round fruit and veggies, but protein too. All from the comfort of your own home.

You probably think an indoor aquaponic gardening system would be expensive, right? Well, yes, if you buy a ready made system that is probably true. The good news is that with a good DIY guide, it’s totally possible to build your own system. Your upfront costs will be offset by the savings from your produce bills. Plus you get the added benefit of knowing where your family’s food is coming from and that it is, in fact, healthy.

So are you ready to grow vegetables year round?



Source by Belinda Whitaker

How to Grow Vegetables and Herbs in 7 Easy Steps

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Growing fresh vegetables and herbs year round for your salads or cooked in the steamer or the oven is a form of intensive cultivation as the best vegetables are sowing, cultivated and harvested in short time spans. Successive plantings mean that you produce young growing tissue and this is always found in the crunchiest, tastiest vegetables. This is how I harvest quality vegetables and herbs year round.

Step 1 – Grouping

Vegetables can be grown in pretty much the same soil. The best vegetable soil is loose, crumby and able to hold water and nutrients. It needs to be fertilized and aerated but the same soil will grow a variety of vegetables. Vegetables are generally grouped into 3 main types-seed vegetables, leaf and stem vegetables and root and bulb vegetables. Group these together because each of these vegetable types require different types and amounts of fertilizer.

Step 2 – Seasonal Planting

Determine whether your vegetables are cool or warm season plants and plant them in season. Brussel sprouts, cauliflower and beans grow well during cooler months while capsicum, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and corn all enjoy warmer growing conditions. Vegetables like cabbage, lettuce and carrots grow in temperatures between warm and cool plantings. Plants these at the correct time of the year as they will ‘go to seed’ if sown when it is too warm or too cool.

Step 3 – Correct Sunlight

For quick growing vegetables select a garden area that is exposed to at least 4-5 hours of sunlight each day. Have part of this garden face the south for the best exposure to sunlight, especially in winter. Avoid shade from other plants or buildings.

Step 4 – Garden Layout

This will depend on your time and interest in gardening vegetables and herbs. Start small and extend after success and follow this. A popular size vegetable garden is about 10 square feet. Plant the vegetables you enjoy but remember that climbing beans and cucumbers grow on a trellis and need little space. Tomatoes and capsicum have high yield crops. Silver beet and broccoli and lettuce are good for continuous harvesting.

Step 5 – Fertilizing

Use a pre-planting fertilizer containing phosphorous before each crop to assist with healthy seedlings and roots. Then root and bulb vegetables require no further fertilizing but leaf vegetables need more nitrogen and seed vegetables need additional mixed fertilizing. Most vegetables and herbs need a lightly acidic soil so fertilize with lime after summer crops and before cool season crops.

Step 6 – Watering

Water well across each season to produce quick-growing vegetables. Vegetables can lose large amounts of water during dry hot seasons. Good soakings in hot weather assist keep them in an exclusive herb garden or use them as borders in your vegetable or flower garden. They also grow well in pots but these will need a liquid fertilizer. Harvest when you need them fresh or if you wish to dry them instead, hang upside down in a shady spot.

Step 7 – What About the Herbs?

A wonderful addition to many vegetable and meat dishes, herbs generally need well drained soil and vary in the amount of sunlight they require.  Easy to grow, often from seedlings, they can be grown in an exclusive herb garden or be used as borders in your vegetable or flower garden.  They also grow well in pots but these will need a liquid fertilizer.  Harvest when you need them fresh or if you wish to dry them instead, hang upside down in a shady spot.

Remember also the benefit of crop rotation to reduce the impact of disease in each vegetable family.



Source by Antonio Fontanes

Vertical Vegetable Gardens Offer Health Benefits and Increased Self-Sufficiency to City Dwellers

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Do you live in the city and would love to have a vegetable garden, but are constrained by a small garden space? If you really want to grow your own fresh vegetables, then there is an answer for you. You may want to plant a vertical vegetable garden right there in your small area. A vertical vegetable gardening can easily produce as much vegetables as a normal garden.

Remember, you don’t need to limit yourself to only growing outdoor vertical gardens. While caring for a vegetable garden in your apartment or other confined area could be a little tricky, it’s not impossible and very rewarding. Gardening indoors will allow you to grow vegetables that aren’t found in your region’s climate, offer you better variety to choose from when planting. It has also been demonstrated that live plants can improve the air quality in small spaces. While it maybe necessary to have proper ventilation to prevent any possible odors, others felt that they can breathe better and are generally calmer because of the refreshing oxygen emitted by your plants.

Vertical vegetables gardens are not a new ideal however at times they are mistaken with a living wall. Since both living walls and vertical vegetable gardens could be used for producing vegetables and fruits, living walls are more focused on beauty than production of food. This form of gardening could be done either in your apartment or in your small backyard garden.

In vertical gardening you train the vegetable plants to grow upwards. They have designed specific structures that contain the entire garden within a small area. With the proper frames and cross shelving setups, you will find it’s rather simple to train your plants to grow vertically.

There are ready-made vertical gardening kits you can buy that will eliminate the guess-work in constructing your setup, however if you want to you can do-it-yourself route. If you decide on a DIY method, be sure that the design structure you”re using to build your vertical vegetable garden is capable of holding the materials, soil, water, and the plants you want to grow in your garden as well as the vegetables it will produce. While you can find detail information online as to the weights of the different parts to your new garden. We have found that such ready-made kits can often save a lot of time – not only with setup, but also they prevented lost “growing” time that you may encounter with wilted plants that did not get the proper amounts of water or soil.

If you decided to build an indoor vertical vegetable garden, spend some time looking for the ideal location, as your plants will need enough sunlight to thrive. If you are in the city area where large buildings block most of the natural light coming from your patio or windowsills, you will need to buy lamps that produced specific light to help in growing plants and vegetables.

If you want a true organic garden, you will want to research how you can apply composting ways to the soil used in your vertical gardens. A proper drainage system is important, as well as good air circulation (whether indoors or out). NASA scientists have researched a variety of vertical gardening methods, which suggest that the supplies and processes of how to grow vegetables and herbs vertically will continue to get better with advance technology. While large grid systems and advanced hydroponic watering techniques may not offer possible solutions for your cement porch, we can use the concepts and the ideas they create and can scale them down to fit our own needs.

It would be good to stick to some simple steps to make sure your success as you begin to learn how to work with your space and your climate restrictions when you grow your first garden. For starters, consider growing peas, green beans, cucumber, squash, lima plants, and tomatoes, as they are great climbing plants in nature. As you become more comfortable you can grow other types of vegetables in your vertical garden.

Also, be sure you have the supplies you’ll need before planting your garden. This is important for plants that need vertical support, because seeds begin germinating almost immediately and it is best not to disturb the dirt by adding supports at a later time. Also make sure that your vertical vegetable garden is not entwined with shrubs or other plants that may divert water away from your plants or block out their sunlight. Once again, after some time, these issues may not be of a primary concern, as a beginner looking to start their first vertical garden you should keep these issues in mind.

Vegetable and herb gardening has always been known to offer “green” ways to lower environmental footprint, but those opportunities has been limited by space and region. Fortunately, with the new fun trend of vertical vegetable gardening, those who live in urban area can enjoy a similar level of increased self-sufficiency as they raise their own, healthy, fresh grown vegetables.



Source by Rain Faye

Winter Gardening – How to Grow Vegetables in Winter

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Most people believe that the vegetable gardening season ends in September and starts all over in April or May. While this may certainly be the time with the most agreeable temperatures – where you will spend more time outside – it isn’t true that winter is a “dead season”.

Besides preparing your soil for the coming spring (what we described in this article) you can, in fact, practice winter gardening and continue to grow vegetables. In this article, I will write mainly about two points: To use season extenders for extending the “warmer” season; and which crops you can grow now (in winter) to generate yields in spring.

How can I continue to grow plants even though it gets cold?

You can use so-called “season extenders” for winter gardening to retain some level of warmness for your plants and to protect them from wind and snow damage. This can be:

With this later system, you’re flexible when it comes to size. You can create small row covers just large enough to cover your plants; or you can create a kind of greenhouses, that you’re able to enter and work inside.

The benefits of these systems are, of course, that you use the greenhouse effect to heat up the air under the respective cover. As it will get cold at night nevertheless, best grow cold-resistant plants.

How to grow vegetables in winter?

There are winter gardening vegetables that can be planted even in late fall or in the winter months (also when the ground is frozen). In fact, some plants (so-called cold season plants) are meant to be planted rather and will not grow as well if planted late in the year.

The benefit of planting early is that a.) You get healthy, resistant plants and b.) You get your vegetable yields much more early (in spring instead of in summer).

Before planting any seeds, you should always clear your beds of all dead plant material (also autumn foliage), crack the ground open, add compost and till it in. You can use organic fertilizers if your soil has been grown heavily during the preceding year.

Typical cold-hardy plants are the following:

You should not grow tubers and roots this early during the year, as they will easily rot from wetness. If, however, you combine the two tips I gave you in this article (cold covers & cold season plants), you can even grow potatoes before their time is due and transplant them into your “normal” beds once the weather gets warm again.

I hope this post motivates you to try winter gardening yourself. I recommend taking a bottle of warm tea along if you’re feeling cold icon wink winter gardening – How to grow vegetables in winter?

If you want to be good gardener then you’ve to well-informed on different gardening tools idea. Happy gardening.

Thank You



Source by Sumon Khan

Winter Gardening – How to Grow Vegetables in Winter

Categories: Tags:

Most people believe that the vegetable gardening season ends in September and starts all over in April or May. While this may certainly be the time with the most agreeable temperatures – where you will spend more time outside – it isn’t true that winter is a “dead season”.

Besides preparing your soil for the coming spring (what we described in this article) you can, in fact, practice winter gardening and continue to grow vegetables. In this article, I will write mainly about two points: To use season extenders for extending the “warmer” season; and which crops you can grow now (in winter) to generate yields in spring.

How can I continue to grow plants even though it gets cold?

You can use so-called “season extenders” for winter gardening to retain some level of warmness for your plants and to protect them from wind and snow damage. This can be:

With this later system, you’re flexible when it comes to size. You can create small row covers just large enough to cover your plants; or you can create a kind of greenhouses, that you’re able to enter and work inside.

The benefits of these systems are, of course, that you use the greenhouse effect to heat up the air under the respective cover. As it will get cold at night nevertheless, best grow cold-resistant plants.

How to grow vegetables in winter?

There are winter gardening vegetables that can be planted even in late fall or in the winter months (also when the ground is frozen). In fact, some plants (so-called cold season plants) are meant to be planted rather and will not grow as well if planted late in the year.

The benefit of planting early is that a.) You get healthy, resistant plants and b.) You get your vegetable yields much more early (in spring instead of in summer).

Before planting any seeds, you should always clear your beds of all dead plant material (also autumn foliage), crack the ground open, add compost and till it in. You can use organic fertilizers if your soil has been grown heavily during the preceding year.

Typical cold-hardy plants are the following:

You should not grow tubers and roots this early during the year, as they will easily rot from wetness. If, however, you combine the two tips I gave you in this article (cold covers & cold season plants), you can even grow potatoes before their time is due and transplant them into your “normal” beds once the weather gets warm again.

I hope this post motivates you to try winter gardening yourself. I recommend taking a bottle of warm tea along if you’re feeling cold icon wink winter gardening – How to grow vegetables in winter?

If you want to be good gardener then you’ve to well-informed on different gardening tools idea. Happy gardening.

Thank You



Source by Sumon Khan

Practical Backyard Landscaping Tips

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Envision a serene sanctuary in your very own backyard. Having difficulty? In just four easy steps, you can transform your dull deck and boring backyard into a place of peaceful seclusion. With backyard landscaping ideas that are simple enough for beginners, your backyard can convert into an area where you can relax and unwind. With a little free time to spare and a lot of determination, your landscape will soon be envied by all.

  1. Scheme a Theme

    If you’re ready to take the plunge and transform your backyard into a tranquil retreat, choose a theme first and foremost. Search the Internet for various backyard landscaping ideas-chances are, you’ll gather more than enough information. When you think of the perfect getaway, do you picture a cabin in the mountains or a lounge chair on the beach? Good backyard landscaping starts with a strategy. Don’t begin the landscaping process until you’ve decided what your theme will be.

  2. Make It Cozy

    Contrary to what you might think, cozy patio living can be achieved on a dime. While you can certainly spend a lot of time and money on improving the look of your patio, it’s just as easy to find charming accessories and furniture at a fraction of the cost. Be attentive when it comes to your budget and look for great buys. A significant part of backyard landscaping is enhancing your patio, as it’s the first thing guests will notice when stepping outside your back door.

    There are plenty of discount design stores that offer outdoor furnishings and appealing accessories. If you find yourself in a store that’s more expensive, then head straight for the clearance section. Candles, pillows and rugs can spruce up your patio without breaking the bank.

  3. Garden Zen

    Backyard landscaping can be a relatively simple and fun experience; however, if you choose to grow a garden, you’ll need to put additional thought into what you’d like. (In fact, you can benefit from seeking the advice of a professional.) Additionally, there are several books available on how to grow a garden. Don’t feel overwhelmed-gardening can be an enjoyable and ongoing task.

    The plants, flowers and vegetables you select for your garden are contingent on factors like the time of year, climate conditions, and personal preference. If you need professional help, drop by the nearest garden store and ask an expert for his or her advice and suggestions.

  4. Keep It Alive & Well

    Attracting wildlife is an excellent way to achieve vitality in your backyard. Butterflies, birds, bees, squirrels and chipmunks, rabbits-your backyard landscape should not only be a retreat for you, but also a safe haven for wildlife. Liven up your backyard… literally. Make it an inviting place for all sorts of species; for example, set up backyard accessories like bird baths, bird feeders and bug boxes. 

Backyard landscaping can be a fun project, and seeing the end result makes it worthwhile. As the economy weakens, why not invest back into your home by enhancing your backyard? Instead of going out for dinner, you’ll find that you’d rather hang back at home and grill out. With so many great backyard landscaping ideas, you can enjoy peace and quiet in your own backyard.  



Source by Alex G. Rogers

Aquaponics – How to Grow Vegetables Quickly

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Aquaponics – how to get a setup running and producing. This is probably the most pertinent question raised when we think of growing fish and vegetables side by side. Aquaponics is indeed the art of growing vegetables as well as fish with the use of very few resources – mainly water that is already available in your fish tank. In short, it is the practice of utilizing the waste coming from your fish tanks to provide nutrients for your vegetables.

It is a fairly simple as well as a completely organic way of growing your favorite vegetables without having to worry about soil cultivation or fertilization, not to mention the use of harmful synthetic fertilizers. In an aquaponics system you only need to feed the fish and you could even make up your own fish food.

Aquaponics – How to make use of your existing fish tank?

Before delving into the details of Aquaponics, let us see how the water from your fish tank comes in handy for growing vegetables. We all know that fish produce a lot of waste, which creates ammonia, which is harmful to the fish if allowed to build up, (a major reason why we need to replace the water at regular intervals in a normal setup unless there is an effective filter system in place) In an aquaponics system the plants do the filtering. However the plants cannot make use of ammonia. What happens is that bacteria will grow naturally in the tank water and they change the ammonia into nitrates. The nitrates work as a natural fertilizer for all types of vegetables thus providing a unique opportunity to grow fresh vegetables with the help of the natural waste produced by the fish.

Research has revealed that the process of growing plants with the help of water from fish tanks helps the vegetables grow at a 50% faster rate than normal. Thus you get the opportunity to see your favorite vegetables grow within a very short period of time. This is not all – now the same water can be recycled back to the fish tank filtered and so keep a clean environment for the fish to live in. .

Aquaponics – How to get started with:

The fundamental practice of starting off with Aquaponics is pretty simple. You need fish tanks and tanks for plants to grow in. There are ready made kits available in the market, though you can easily design and make your own system. Whatever you do, the basic answer to the question of how to get started with aquaponics is that you need to know

1. What you hope to achieve,

2. The available space,

3. The type of system you want to build.

Aquaponics once established do not take much of your time to look after. Whatever system you opt for, the fish tanks are always at a lower level than the grow beds as then the water from the beds can naturally flow back into the fish tanks. Remember that the water is recycled and because of that aquaponics uses only about 2% of the volume of water that would be used in your home garden.

You will need a pump to put a fixed amount of water into the beds so that the plants always get an adequate amount of water with their required nutrients and to send it filtered back to the tank. In some systems the roots of the plants remain submerged in the water, while in another the water is pumped to the plants and allowed to drain.

Aquaponics is beneficial in three ways

  1. You get fresh vegetables,
  2. You get fresh fish and
  3. It will save you quite a bit of money.



Source by Johan Snijder

How To Garden Without A Garden

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There are many of us who would love to try out our gardening skills but we don’t have access to a garden. Never fear, because there are other options we may wish to consider.

If you live in an apartment building, how about window boxes? If your building has a courtyard area, contact the person in charge and see if you might be able to plan and take care of a portion of the courtyard. You may want to scout the surroundings first and see what is available. If you have a plan in mind before you talk to someone about creating a garden space or a beautifully crafted flower display, then you may have a better chance of success.

If you share a house or flat with other renters, you may want to see what yard space is available for your use. Many times owners will jump at the chance to have the occupants take care of the yard work, as that saves time and money for them. If space allows, you may be able to grow some food as well as a variety of eye-catching flowers and foliage.

Rocks, bricks and pebbles can be used to contain and highlight small spaces used for planting. These look good left in their natural colors or you can try adding contrast by painting them in coordinating colors to show off your gardening space. Be creative here; you are only limited by your own imagination.

Small spaces can also be conducive to hanging baskets. Look for places where a hanging basket could be very appealing visually and yet not in the way of walking spaces.

When planning the variety of plants you would like to plant, make sure you do your research as to what grows well in your climate, when the flowering times or harvest times are, and how much water and tending they will require. If you have acquired special permission to use apartment-owned space, make sure that you keep your spot tended, well-kept and looking magnificent. This will create the biggest impression. Remember, this is likely a very public place which will be seen by many people. It is the perfect way to show off your gardening skills.

Don’t forget about using your indoor living space as well. There are many plants, ferns, flowers and even herbs which grow well indoors, in full natural light from a window. If you have a balcony, they can be set outside on nice days. Keep in mind that pots dry out quickly so don’t set them out in the hot sun without checking their water level periodically.

Even without your own garden, there are ways to be a gardener and hone your gardening skills by growing plants, vegetables, flowers and foliage for all to enjoy.



Source by Ryan Traenor

How to Grow Vegetables in Containers

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 Growing  fruits and  vegetables  in containers is easy, even for  a  beginner, and can be  a  good idea if you don’t have  a  large  garden . There are many types of  vegetables  suitable  to   grow  in this way including green onions, eggplant, squash, cucumbers, green beans and, probably the most often  grown  like this, tomatoes. Some of these are climbing  plants  so will need some support such as wooden posts, trellis or wire cages. You can place containers on patios, balconies or anywhere you have  a  warm, suitable space.

Which  vegetable  varieties are suitable  to   grow  in containers?

Not all varieties of these  vegetables  can be  grown  in containers, you will generally have to choose dwarf varieties, sometimes called ‘mini veg’ or described as ‘suitable for close spacing’. For beans choose  a  variety such as Hestia or the Sutton, for tomatoes Balconi, Patio, Sweet 1000 or Tiny Tim. California Wonder Peppers and Minnesota Midget Melons are also suitable. For lettuces try Little Gem or Tom Thumb. All of these varieties take up less space than the regular varieties and have been specially adapted  to   grow  in confined spaces.

What type of containers should you choose?

Almost any type of container can be used, just make sure it is big enough and has plenty of drainage holes. Some types of tomatoes  grow  very well in hanging baskets. Pots made from terracotta are attractive but require more looking after than plastic pots as they tend to dry out much faster. If possible choose  a  light coloured pot as they are cooler in the hotter months and conserve heat less than darker colored pots so won’t cause the soil to overheat as readily. Use  a  drip tray under the pots to help conserve water.

What are suitable locations for  vegetable  containers?

You can place your pots on  a  balcony or patio but make sure they will be in the sunshine for most of the day.  Vegetables  will need  a  minimum of 6 hours of sunlight  a  day  to   grow  well. In colder climates it’s  a  good idea to place them against  a  wall that faces south. You could also put the pots on  a  movable platform so that you can move them around to get sunlight from every direction which will result in more even growth and allows you to move them out of the sun in the hottest part of the day.

 How  should you  plant  your  vegetable  container?

You will need to use  a  good quality potting compost. Ordinary  garden  soil is not recommended for container  gardening  as it may not have the right balance of nutrients and may contain pests and weed seed. The  vegetables  can be bought as young transplants or you could  grow  them indoors or in  a  greenhouse from seed. Once they are transplanted to your pots place some mulch on the top of the soil to help conserve moisture. You could use leaf mold or straw. Don’t crowd the seedlings, give them plenty of space  to   grow  and insert  a  framework for them to climb if needed.

 How  often should you water your  vegetable  containers?

Most containers will need daily watering and you could add  a  weak nutrient solution three or four times  a  week. Don’t water directly on the  plants  but around their bases as water on the leaves can encourage mold and fungus. Don’t allow the pots to become waterlogged but make sure the drainage is adequate.

Conclusion

It’s fun  growing   growing   vegetables  in containers and easy enough even for  a  beginner gardener. You will be well rewarded when you harvest your crop of fresh  vegetables , ready for the cooking or adding to your salad.



Source by Janet Ashby

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